BreakPoint: #MeToo

Human Dignity, Sexual Morality, and Christian Responsibility

The curtain is being lifted on sexual predation. That’s good. And it reveals why we cannot abandon Christianity’s liberating vision of human sexuality.

The recent ugly revelations about Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein, coming on the heels of similar revelations about Bill O’Reilly and Roger Ailes of Fox News, has many American women saying “enough!”

Via a flood of posts on Twitter and other social media, women, using the hashtag #MeToo, are demonstrating that sexual harassment, assault, and rape isn’t a problem limited to a relative handful of high-profile creeps.

I applaud their courage. After all, among Christianity’s greatest contributions to the world has been its revolutionary ideas about the dignity of women. To not stand up for that dignity is to betray that heritage.

And to understand why betrayal is the right word, we need to understand the pagan world into which Christianity was born, a world classics scholar Sarah Ruden describes in her 2010 book, “Paul Among the Peoples.”

With the exception of a few highborn women, Roman women were often treated worse than Roman cattle. Even upper-class women were little more than possessions, and when it came to sexuality, they were at their husband’s beck and call and could be disposed of at will.

Slave women, which were a full third of Rome’s female population, could expect beatings and rape. The “fortunate” ones were sold into prostitution. Unwanted girls were left to die of exposure.

Into this world came Christianity, specifically the writings of St. Paul. As Ruden tells her readers, to call him an “oppressor of women” could “hardly be more wrong.” “Paul’s teachings on sexual purity and marriage were adopted as liberating in the pornographic, sexually exploitive Greco-Roman culture of the time . . .”

Christianity “worked a cultural revolution,” she writes, “restraining and channeling the male Eros, elevating the status of both women and of the human body, and infusing marriage—and marital sexuality—with love.” In Ruden’s words, Christian ideas about marriage were “as different from anything before or since as the command to turn the other cheek.”

Of course, sexually-predatory males didn’t go extinct, but until just recently—and thanks largely to Christian influence—they couldn’t rationalize their predations, either.

But all that’s changed. As David French wrote in the National Review, “You can sum up the sexual ethic of the sexual revolutionary in one sentence: Except in the most extreme circumstances (such as incest), consenting adults define their own moral norms.”

He continues, “Consent is determined by the request, and in a completely sexualized culture, the request can come at any time, anywhere, and from any person you encounter—regardless of the power imbalance or the propriety of the location.”

Given the damage wrought by this change the last thing we should be doing as Christians is running from the clear, life-giving vision of human sexuality that liberated the pagan world.

Yet that’s exactly what many of us are doing. We’re rationalizing our own surrender to the sexual ethos of the day, even thinking ourselves “loving” and “tolerant” to abandon the historic Christian teaching on sex and marriage. But given the brokenness around us, it’s cruel—not loving—to withhold the truth in our confused culture.

But that’s not our only betrayal. Too often, in our churches and Christian institutions, we have turned a blind eye or pretended to not know about the sexual abuse or harassment happening within. That’s a horrific betrayal of people made in the image of God, as well as of the truth that can set them free.

And then there’s politics. Within five years, white evangelicals went from being “the least likely to the most likely group to agree that a candidate’s personal immorality has no bearing on his performance in public office.” That’s scandalous, and it’s biblically indefensible.

On no altar, especially not political expediency or cultural relevance, can Christians ever sacrifice the beautiful, life-giving vision of human sexuality that the Bible presents. To do so is to rob the world of a divine gift that has changed cultures in the past, and can do so again.

 

#MeToo: Human Dignity, Sexual Morality, and Christian Responsibility

As John said, Christians have the opportunity to present the truth and beauty of God’s design for human sexuality. We also have the responsibility to speak out against anything that demeans the dignity and betrays the humanity of those created in God’s image, wherever that may occur.

Resources

It’s Past Time to Rethink Modern Sexual Morality
  • David French | National Review | October 15, 2017
  • Robert P. Jones
  • The Atlantic
  • July 4, 2017

Comment Policy: Commenters are welcome to argue all points of view, but they are asked to do it civilly and respectfully. Comments that call names, insult other people or groups, use profanity or obscenity, repeat the same points over and over, or make personal remarks about other commenters will be deleted. After multiple infractions, commenters may be banned.

  • Zarm

    Your 6th paragraph is duplicated.

    Thank you for this excellent article; that’s actually a context of Paul’s writings that I had never heard before. May the church herald this wakeup call not to compromise- on anything, but especially on the dignity and protection of all those around us.

  • Joel Stucki

    “And then there’s politics. Within five years, evangelicals went from being “the least likely to the most likely group to agree that a candidate’s personal immorality has no bearing on his performance in public office.” That’s scandalous, and it’s biblically indefensible.”

    Amen. Which is why as a Christian conservative, I never once even remotely considered voting for President Trump, and I continue to be totally mystified as to why any Christian could (including members of my own immediate family). The only reason he got the nomination in the first place was due to massive moral failure on the part of Evangelical Christians in America. We reserve our political activism to fighting abortion and gay marriage, but we failed to keep our own house in order. The only Christians I have been able to find who didn’t vote for Donald Trump are myself, my wife, and my mother. Sickening. Unthinkable. How did it come to this? We convinced ourselves that no one could be a greater enemy than Hilary Clinton, and so we stopped caring who we put up against her, as long as she lost. How tragically short sighted.

    • Zarm

      Indeed. It was ‘the enemy of my enemy [or enemy political causes] is my ally.’ Believe me, there are plenty of Christians in my household, church, and circle of friends who didn’t vote Trump… but, for the exact reasons you cite (and especially the ‘all-important’ Supreme Court nominee), we all have friends and family who did.

      A very well-written comment, and too sadly true. And for pity’s sake, even those of us that did vote for him, let’s not double-down on that mistake by feeling like we have to *defend* him when he, or any of his cabinet, stand for something unbiblical; and how much moreso if the culture is the one standing against the Word that God gave us!

    • Phoenix1977

      That’s exactly why Trump asked Pence to be his running mate. Not because he thinks so highly of him but because Mike Pence could deliver him the Christian vote.

    • Sara

      I think to say that that any of us who voted for President stopped caring who we put up against her is dismissing how difficult it was for some of us to vote for him. Many, including myself, may not have wanted to vote for him but knew we were being obedient to the Lord when doing so. You should watch Jonathan Cahn speaking on this and maybe you will find some peace in where we are at in America. We are at a pivotal moment in time and should turn our faces back to him.

      • Joel Stucki

        How did you know you were being obedient? That’s very interesting; I knew just as certainly that I was being obedient by NOT voting for the President. Only one of us can be right…

  • justified and thankful

    Every week now I watch the Duggar’s courtships and marriages with tears in my eyes. Ten years ago I would have dismissed their views on purity as radical and unattainable. Now my heart aches for what could have been….being cherished, covered, confident and committed until death to a faithful partner. What they model is biblical and displays God’s best plan for courtship and marriage. And when the promo’s come on for other TLC programs regarding 90 day fiancee’s, trans-gender teens, psychics and multiple partner marriage Counting On shines like a beacon.

  • Karen Keil

    I agree that the curtain is being lifted (again) on sexual predation, but it seems to me to be lifting to a melodrama that does not represent the facts. Yes, of course, Christians need to be proclaiming the freedom and joy that is found in Christian sexual morality, but I think that Christians also need to differentiate between the show that the popular media is presenting and what the research is showing on the subject. There are 400,000 registered sexual predators, and 431,000 sexual assaults per year (approx – which is a more than 50% decline over the past four decades.) Even if we triple the number of assaults to adjust for unreported assaults, that means that fewer than 10% of the 147 million men in the US commit sexual assaults. Granted one sexual assault is too many, but the “No means no” campaign presents the problem as being that the vast majority of men don’t understand that “no means no” and need to be educated. The truth of the matter is that those who sexually assault don’t care if the woman says “No,” In fact, that makes it all the more fulfilling for them because the whole point is power, and what is power if not the ability to overcome resistance by force? Another interesting statistic that isn’t reported? Over half of all rapists report having been under the influence of alcohol at the time of the rape. I don’t recall what percentage of rape victims reported being under the influence – but there is a correlation there that shouldn’t be ignored. (No, I’m not saying that alcohol causes rape, but it does reduce rational behavior and increase irrational behavior.)

  • But given the brokenness around us, it’s cruel—not loving—to withhold the truth in our confused culture. This! This is what I find myself saying on the reg to many! How do folks not get this profound nugget? Not speaking the truth, which is Jesus, is unloving! Not the other way around!

  • God’s Holy written Word remains ever true, no matter how many are not aligning their comportment with it. As mere humans, we will always fall short. His Word must, and will, shine in the darkness, come what may. Didn’t Jesus declare, in Matthew 7: “21 “Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven. 22 Many will say to Me in that day, ‘Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name, cast out demons in Your name, and done many wonders in Your name?’ 23 And then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness!’

    • Phoenix1977

      Wonderful. But if your god is so powerful and if your Jesus loved the children so much, why didn’t they prevent all those innocentsouls to be damaged? I couldn’t care less what wonderful words there are in your bible. Your god and your Jesus failed countless innocent children who were hurt by people speaking in your gods name.

      • Steve

        No, it was the people who did not follow God and Jesus who hurt others.

        • Phoenix1977

          Probably true. Doesn’t change the fact your almighty god could have stopped it if he wanted to. Unless he’s either not that powerful of simply doesn’t care. And if he indeed exists. Crimes against innocence like this are a powerful clue he doesn’t, or doesn’t care or doesn’t have the required power.

      • Scott

        “Wonderful. But if your god is so powerful and if your Jesus loved the children so much, why didn’t they prevent all those innocent souls to be damaged?”

        Because He gave every human the choice. The line between good and evil runs straight through the heart of every one of us. We do not get to define good or evil either… instead we are just given a choice between the two.

        “I couldn’t care less what wonderful words there are in your bible. Your god and your Jesus failed countless innocent children who were hurt by people speaking in your gods name.”

        “Don’t look behind the curtain” right?… “Do as I say, not as I do.” People fail. God does not. You might not care about those words, but they exist. And they make wonderful changes to the hearts of those who let them in. To those who know those words but do not let them in… well… we can see the tragic affects in some of your examples.

        • Phoenix1977

          “Because He gave every human the choice. ”
          Really? And what choice did he give the victims? What choice did they have when their innocence was destroyed? Or did they actually chose to get violated?

          “God does not.”
          Tell that to children who will never be able to have a normal life again. Who will never be able to truly trust again. Who will never be able to have a normal love life because your god did not intervene.

  • How in the hairy heck can a follower of Christ separate their faith from any sphere of life?

  • Scott

    Your right about Jesus…

    But Jesus should not be separated from anything in our lives.

    “Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.” – Revelation 3:20 (NIV)

    If we invite Him into our car, should He sit in the back seat? Shall we put Him in the trunk? Should He sit “shotgun?” No. He is the driver. See if we invite Him into our hearts, that means He makes the decisions… like how we treat others, how we spend our money, how we work, how we spend our free time, what we read, what we say, even how we vote, etc.
    That is how we love him.

    • gladys1071

      Not politics, i don’t think Jesus needs to be inserted into our politics. The reason is politics is a way of harnessing power over people, I don’t believe Jesus wants us to have power over other people.

      So i agree with you on the others, but not political power.

      • Joel Stucki

        I suspect you are talking about two different things. I would say that whenever the Church has wielded political power, it has done so at the expense of authenticity; that when the Church makes the law, the less it looks like the Church and the more it looks like any other political power. On that, Gladys, I think we agree.

        But that cannot mean that an individual Christian should not consider the Lord when they vote. And it certainly cannot mean that religion should have no influence in political life; indeed, religion is such a fundamental aspect of humanity that I doubt it’s even possible.

        We live in a democratic republic, where (at least in theory) the government is representative of the will of the people. If a large portion of those people are Christians, then supposedly that should be reflected in the government. It’s not a question of the Church per se holding public office or legislating, it’s simply a matter of the government accurately reflecting the values of the voters. If the government is NOT doing that, then either 1) the government is going rogue, or 2) voters are not voting in accordance with their own values.

        I am suggesting that in the case of electing the current President, Evangelical Christians are guilty of the second problem. And I’m calling them out on it, because without Evangelical backing, there is simply no way that Donald Trump survives the primaries, much less wins the general election.

        • gladys1071

          I disagree, i don’t believe in voting my Christian values. I am neither a republican or democrat and i believe my religious beliefs are private and not to be legislated in the halls of power.

          We live in a pluralistic society with people of different faiths, beliefs and some non-belief, I want a secular government, where religious beliefs and government are separate.

          I am not an evangelical Christian, i am a Christian, but i will not align myself with evangelicals,for they want to political power and i do NOT.

          As i stated, i want a secular government, not a government favoring any religious belief, whether it be Chrisitian buddhist or Muslim.

          The proper role of government is stay out of people private religious beliefs and vice versa.

          • Scott

            “We live in a pluralistic society with people of different faiths, beliefs and some non-belief, I want a secular government, where religious beliefs and government are separate.”

            Not quite, but we are the closest thing to a plural society.

            “I am not an evangelical Christian, i am a Christian, but i will not align myself with evangelicals,for they want to political power and i do NOT.”
            There is nothing wrong with being evangelical… after all, Jesus did say:

            “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” Matthew 28:19-20

            Those who seek power over others are a different matter entirely and perhaps not true to their faith. : – )

            As i stated, i want a secular government, not a government favoring any religious belief, whether it be Chrisitian buddhist or Muslim.

            Yes, so long as there is ample room for all to practice their chosen religion… including outside their own homes and churches.

            The proper role of government is stay out of people private religious beliefs and vice versa.”

            The government should allow freedom of religion and nothing more or less. Did you know our government’s laws are based on the Judeo-Christian values found in the Bible? If they were based on any other set of beliefs they would be far more oppressive and look quite differently.

          • gladys1071

            “The government should allow freedom of religion and nothing more or less. Did you know our government’s laws are based on the Judeo-Christian values found in the Bible?”

            Yes i am aware of that, but it still does not change my belief that religious belief is private and that our government should NOT favor any particular religion. Our founding fathers some of them were deists, not necessarily Christian.

            what do you mean by practicing your religion outside the home? do you meant seeking legislative power? what exactly do you mean?

          • Scott

            “what do you mean by practicing your religion outside the home? do you meant seeking legislative power? what exactly do you mean?”

            No… Just the freedom to speak about my faith and live according to my Christian values. Power (for the sake of control) over others is not something Jesus wanted us to seek. God gave us free will from the beginning and that is the model we should advocate.

          • gladys1071

            ok, i agree with what you are saying, as far as i know i am free to live my Christian values just fine no matter who is president. In no way has any president or politician come between me and God.

            So how is the government interfering with how you live your Christian values?

            Just curious?

          • Joel Stucki

            I’m neither a republican nor democrat as well. But your position makes no sense to me. Do you vote against your own Christian values? If you have values at all, presumably you are voting along those lines, whether your values are Christian or not. Unless you just aren’t voting.

            Assuming you vote at all, then you are either voting for your Christian values or you are voting against them. There really isn’t a middle ground. We can perhaps prioritize certain values over others, but I don’t understand what you mean when you say you don’t vote your Christian values.

      • Scott

        I think I agree with you? However to clarify:

        Jesus does not teach us to seek power over others… But He does want power over our own lives. The metaphor I used likened the car to my/our heart/s. Jesus wants control over our hearts. So as a Christian, I make all my decisions based on what I think Jesus would desire if He were (in) me. Of course I probably fail miserably, but I repent when I recognize those failures and ask Jesus for guidance (seeking his word in scripture). I consider Christianity a life orientation and if so, that means Jesus needs to be involved in every decision I make… including how I vote.

        That said: There were no Christian voting options last (presidential) election, so we were left to weigh which option was worse or waste our vote on someone we thought better suited than those on the ballot.

        You know its interesting… when you say “I don’t believe Jesus wants us to have power over other people.” I couldn’t agree more. No Christian should seek power over others. I think that is exactly the type of Christian that would be right for a political job… a servant leader… imagine that. : – )

        • gladys1071

          “You know its interesting… when you say “I don’t believe Jesus wants us to have power over other people.” I couldn’t agree more. No Christian should seek power over others. I think that is exactly the type of Christian that would be right for a political job… a servant leader… imagine that”

          By voting your faith, you are seeking to have your values legislated and to have power over others. That is why i DON’T vote for the most part, if i do vote for a candidate, it has nothing to do with trying to legislate or enforce Christian values over anyone.

          I don’t care who is president, It changes nothing about my relationship with God.

          I don’t think Jesus cares who you vote for, he is not about political parties and earthly political power, I don’t think Jesus cares if you are democrat or Republican.

          I find this idea of inserting Jesus into who we vote for quite strange.

          • Scott

            “I don’t care who is president, It changes nothing about my relationship with God.”

            True!

            “I don’t think Jesus cares who you vote for, he is not about political parties and earthly political power, I don’t think Jesus cares if you are democrat or Republican.”

            Certainly not. But He does care about whether or not our mind is focused on what He says… This is how we develop a relationship with Him. What He says should affect everything we think about. Including politics.

            “I find this idea of inserting Jesus into who we vote for quite strange.”

            It might be helpful not to think of it that way… the only place we (you and I) can insert Jesus is into our own hearts and minds. I would rather think of it this way: We insert Him into how we think about the world around us. He should shape our hearts and guide our every move, if I move towards the ballot box, then He is coming with me, in my heart as well as my mind. : – )

          • gladys1071

            Ok, so following your train of thought, how exactly do you think Jesus would vote?

            You see to me what you are saying does not make sense. The only way that would make sense is to try to vote to impose our values on others, which Jesus does not call us too.

            As far as believing and worshipping as we please, we already have that freedom. We have the freedom to share our faith with our friends and family, that has not been taken away.

            You say that Jesus wants us to be focused on what he says, yes he called us to love our neighbor, he calls us to leave in peace with one another. Their is no political agenda there?

            Voting and seeking political power is NOT part of Jesus telling us what to do.

  • Phoenix1977

    You can twist my words six ways to Sunday and still you would be wrong. Christian churches claim to be morally superior but it’s nothing more than “do as I say, not as I do”.
    And I already told you what I expect of Christians. I expect you to clean house. I expect you to not rest until all sexual predators in your churches, hospitals and other organisations are found, prosecuted and safely locked behind bars where they will never hurt another innocent again. And once you have accomplished that Christians can condemn others about sexual abuse. Not a minute earlier.

    • Tyler

      That’s a huge misunderstanding of Christianity in general, but also totally illogical. There was no twisting of words. Sexual assault happens universally, regardless of alliances and worldviews. Christianity itself would actually accept (but also lament) that sexual assault happens within the church. Why? Because Christians (regardless of what you say) do not actually claim moral superiority, in fact the apostle Paul refers to himself as the chief of sinners. Jesus taught that those who are blessed are poor in spirit, meaning that they accept that they are morally corrupt. So though all sin is tragic and sad, we shouldn’t be surprised that it shows up in the church, but I also take issue with your baseless claim that the church in general holds itself as morally superior. Some individual Christians (or those who would claim to be Christians) might say those things. The church as a whole would overwhelmingly claim otherwise. You also skirted my argument. Should we “clean house” of our government officials before any more work is done with sexual assault laws?

      • Phoenix1977

        “So though all sin is tragic and sad, we shouldn’t be surprised that it shows up in the church”
        All the more reason to keep children as far away from the church as possible.

        “I also take issue with your baseless claim that the church in general holds itself as morally superior.”
        Baseless? Ever read any of my comments? Why don’t you go out into the world and ask random non-Christians how they are treated now or have been treated in the past by Christians, Christian churches or Christian organisations. Be warned, though. I don’t think you’ll like the outcome.
        I was already an outcast in my church before my coming out because I refused to follow blindly. More than once I was called a blasphemist for requiring more than the word of a preacher. The reverend in my church once told me I should stop asking questions because all answers were in the bible and if I didn’t find the answer in the bible the question wasn’t worth being asked. Now imagine what happened when I left the church and came out. It wasn’t pretty and I suffered for it, by the hands of those I broke bread with only months earlier, sanctioned by the reverend of my former church AND the board overseeing the church.
        Do you know what actually is baseless? Your defense of churches and Christian organisations while you know nothing of the things non-Christians or former Christians go through due to said churches and organisations.

        “Should we “clean house” of our government officials before any more work is done with sexual assault laws?”
        Sounds like a good idea. I suggest you start with the White House, before your president grabs another by the … you know. Talk about moral bankruptcy.

  • Phoenix1977

    Again, what I expect of you is to clean your own house before addressing others about theirs. Of, to interpret Matthew 7, verse 3-5, I expect you to address the plank in your own eye completely before addressing spects of sawdust in those of others. I think you will have your work cut out for you if you do.
    And yes, it is quite presumptious of me. Glad you see that too because it’s just as presumptious to say there is a problem in Hollywood when the Christians churches and organisations are still in the business of covering up sexual abuse in their ranks and protecting the perpetrators instead of the vicitms.

    • Scott

      I haven’t been following Breakpoint for very long and the scandalous stories about the sexual abuse by Catholic priests might have been before I started following articles closely. Were there any articles on Breakpoint about these stories?

      If not, you make a good point. If there were than perhaps that type of progress should encourage you? If nothing else, it shows your Christian enemies are trying to look introspectively. : – )

      • Phoenix1977

        “If nothing else, it shows your Christian enemies are trying to look introspectively. : – )”
        Perhaps they should do that a lot harder and longer before commenting on others.

  • Zarm

    Do the presence of white supremacists mean that all white people should stay silent on issues of racial oppression or injustice? Rather, wouldn’t the existence of such disgraceful behavior even *tangentially* connected to any group that one identifies with only increase the need to speak out the truth and counter those negative elements?

    And regardless, the reprehensible actions of individuals not in accord with the tennets we hold to do nothing to diminish that message. We are not talking about sharing on own righteousness on matters, but God’s Word- one that condemns the actions of those individuals as soundly as abuse anywhere else.

  • Joel Stucki

    Why? because I know way too many people who voted for the President who would NEVER have done so if he had a “D” after his name on the ballot instead of an R, that’s why. I know people who convinced me, back in 1997, that President Clinton’s infidelity affected his fitness for the job who just voted for a guy who’s much, much worse. Because you can bet that if President Trump had come out as a pro-choice candidate (which he almost did), the Evangelical voters of this country would have come out of the woodwork to attack his character and unfitness for office. But since he declared himself to be pro-life, everyone got upset for about 24 hours over the Billy Bush tape and then swept it under the rug like it didn’t matter.

    That’s why.

    I am absolutely not wrapping faith in the American flag. If you knew me, you wouldn’t even bring that up. I am not comfortable calling the USA a Christian nation, and it drives me nuts when people connect 2 Chronicles 7:14 to the United States.

    But I do oppose hypocrisy. And if I am a Christian, then I must consider in all things how God would want me to act, including in the voting booth. And I just cannot accept the notion that voting for or otherwise supporting President Trump was the right thing to do, for anyone. The fact that God allowed him to be President does not make him a good President, nor does it absolve us of responsibility for electing him.

    • gladys1071

      I think your dislike for Donald Trump is clouding your judgment. I did not vote for Trump, but nor do i really care who is president that much. It changes nothing in my life whether a republican or democrat is president.

      My faith is not affected by who is in office, so i really don’t understand all of the hysterics about the president, from both sides either for or against.

      If people are really that upset about Donald Trump being president, well then they should really examine themselves on who they really worship, is it God or the president.

      You saying voting for trump was wrong is YOUR opinion, and you being upset about other Christians voting for trump is really you giving way too much importance to politics.

      Politics is politics and religion is religion, not good to mix the two, that has always been the way i relate to how i believe.

      I mean what i say with respect.

  • Gina Dalfonzo

    “However, it is a simple fact Christian churches, organisations and institutions are condemning sexual abuse in other places but are simply not doing anything to stop those crimes in their own ranks.”

    To use your own words, that’s simply not the case. Many churches are not doing enough. But it is not true that churches as a whole are not doing anything.

    I’ve warned you before about bashing entire groups. I don’t want to have to do it again.

    • Phoenix1977

      “But it is not true that churches as a whole are not doing anything.”
      Too little, too late.

  • Zarm

    But that’s simply not true. *Some* organizations and churches may be doing that; I can’t peak to the Catholic church and don’t claim any connection to them. At mine, we have background checks on all childcare volunteers, accountability checks, multiple volunteers at any given time to prevent any volunteer being alone with kids- we ARE taking steps to prevent sexual predators. So your claim to start living them… we’re doing that.

    I have done everything I can for my own church, would endorse any effort to do the same at other churches outside my denomination where I have no say, voice, or authority, and int he mean time, would advocate protecting the victims because I find it find no logic or merit in the suggestion that one should STOP trying to prevent a crime against innocents somewhere because it is not being prevented somewhere else. Everything I can do, I am.

  • Gina Dalfonzo

    Because most of these comment threads are going around and around in circles and not going anywhere productive, I’m closing comments on this post.