Weekly Review

Pro-life Victories, Adoption Success, A Judicial Scorecard, and Remembering Beethoven and Flannery O’Connor

FDA Cracks Down. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said the Dutch abortion group Aid Access must stop mailing abortion-inducing drugs to women in the United States. The FDA said Aid Access offers “misbranded and unapproved…drugs” on its website. “FDA requests that you immediately cease causing the introduction of these violative drugs into U.S. commerce,” the letter stated. “Failure to correct these violations may result in FDA regulatory action, including seizure or injunction, without further notice.” The action was welcomed by pro-life advocates, but it also came as a surprise. The FDA has allowed tele-abortions, in which abortionists will prescribe abortion drugs from a remote location after a telephone consultation with the mother. For $95, Aid Access would send abortion drugs to women after an on-line chat. The fight is not over, however, as it is unlikely that Aid Access founder Rebecca Gomperts will comply with the FDA letter, and it is not clear that the FDA will pursue enforcement proceedings.

Fighting for Life in Kentucky and Mississippi. Two states passed laws to protect the unborn in the past week. Gov. Matt Bevin, a Republican, signed a law last Tuesday to protect the unborn from abortion based on race, sex, or a disability diagnosis. The American Civil Liberties Union has already sued to prevent implementation of the new law. Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, also a Republican, signed a law Thursday that will protect babies from abortion after they have a detectable heartbeat. Again, a pro-abort group, The Center for Reproductive Rights, said it plans to sue.

Tommy Finds A Home. The leaders of a Christian adoption agency, Nighlight Christian Adoptions, feared it would have trouble finding a home for Tommy.  Tommy was born with microcephaly, a severe brain handicap. But they need not have worried. Thousands of people responded to the note the group posted on-line. In fact, the response crashed the organization’s website. “It has greatly inspired our staff,” Nightlight Christian Adoptions President Daniel Nehrbass told WORLD. “We worried that we would have difficulty finding a family. We never knew there were so many kind-hearted people out there!”

Judiciary Scorecard. President Donald Trump said he would re-shape the courts, and that is one promise he has taken significant steps to fulfill. Not only has Trump appointed two conservative Supreme Court justices, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, the Senate has now also confirmed 91 of Trump’s lower court appointees, compared to 75 of Obama’s appointees at this same point in his term, according to data from The Heritage Foundation. This statistic is important, said Tom Jopping, deputy director of the Edwin Meese Center for Legal and Judicial Studies at The Heritage Foundation, because “around 99 percent of the cases in the federal court system never reach the Supreme Court. Lower federal court judges … have the last word on virtually every case.”

Milestones. Novelist and short story writer Flannery O’Connor was born on this date in 1925. To listen to my interview with O’Connor biographer Jonathan Rogers, click here. Jonathan Rogers will be a part of our Wilberforce Weekend. For more information, click here…. Ludwig von Beethoven died on this date in 1827. An abortion survivor, Beethoven wrote some of the greatest music in history. A short film about his mother’s decision to choose life, Crescendo, can be found here.


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