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Should we criticize people who do not choose who they are? If they do something that the bible says is immoral, but they do not have a choice whether or not they do it, much like how we cannot choose whether or not to breathe, then should we judge?

Joe Cassava

From Chuck Colson:

I assume you’re talking about homosexual behavior. However, I’m very glad you didn’t specify what kind of “immorality” you mean. Why? Because your question could just as easily apply to any sin. Let me give you an example by rewording your email:

“Should we criticize a man and a woman if they have sex outside of marriage, but they do not have a choice whether or not they do it?”

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Rating: 5.00
Comments: 28
We listened to Breakpoint this morning (Dec. 14th), and we couldn't believe our ears. Do you REALLY believe that raising taxes is a reasonable solution to our current economic woes? Chuck, we're starting to think you've been in Washington too long. You were in agreement with the first stimulus package (why?), and now you think raising taxes would be okay, if it will help. Raising taxes only hurts the hard-working taxpayer (us included, a shrinking population, by the way. .) and keeps businesses from hiring. As we tighten our belts even more, less spending occurs, the economy is even LESS stimulated, and tax revenues DECREASE. We can't believe you didn't learn the opposite from Reagan's great example. . . When you, a respected Christian leader publicly proclaim that higher taxes might be a solution (basically), you influence the uninformed, and you disillusion those of us who have thought so highly of your ideas. . . Maybe you, with your well-off economic status, can afford higher taxes, but we, and most of America, CANNOT. . . PLEASE reconsider your position, and if you should change your thinking, please make it known publicly. Thanks for listening.

Dave & Bette Arends

From Chuck Colson:

Sometimes in politics, decisions aren’t easy. Very often, lawmakers find themselves faced with two options: the greater evil and the lesser evil. In such a case, voting either way will make a lot of people angry. Needless to say, prudence and the ability to hold your nose both come in very handy.

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Rating: 2.99
I've recently come to read and hear more and more of your opinions over the internet and I am curious as to your answer to my question. Do you believe in everything the Bible says? I ask because it seems to me that the Bible might only be used as a guide, not as God's rule book, because it wasn't written down as a standardized Bible (and therefore could have been tampered with and corrupted by individuals who failed to see the importance of God's messages) for a good chunk of time, say, a thousand years or so. Given that it could contain the corruption of God's word, do you still believe in every line of it? And if you don't, then do you pick and choose which lines of the Bible to believe and which lines of the Bible to ignore? How do you pick? Do you use your own moral judgment? If you do, how do you reconcile the fact that one's moral judgment may not necessarily be God's and that to superimpose one's own beliefs over the words of God is essentially an act of hubris? Also, do you believe with the same vigor and dedication in every portion of the Bible, or do you believe in some parts more than others?

Ryan

From Chuck Colson:

Your question is absolutely critical. If the Bible is not accurate and reliable, then nothing we Christians believe about ourselves, the world around us, or even God, has any ultimate foundation.

The question is so critical, that I devoted an entire chapter (chapter 3) of my latest book, The Faith, on the reliability of Scripture. The Faith is available at our bookstore here at BreakPoint.

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Rating: 3.00
For some 40 or so years, liberals have done everything they could to erase our Christian heritage, using the "separation of church and state" argument. Since it DOES NOT appear in our Constitution, I wonder why Christians can't do anything to stop the use of this statement. Groups like Alliance Defense Fund 'fight it' but no one really seems serious about do something to eliminate its use! Why not?
Meredith

From Chuck Colson:

Thanks very much for your question. I think I know where you are coming from, but I might change the question this way: How do we get people to quit mis-using the phrase “separation of church and state”? Because, in the end, Christians should support the separation of church and state.

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Rating: 2.99
I have two questions: In [a recent] article you indicate you subscribe to Netflix. We also used to but stopped because of Netflix support of gay agenda. Other video rentals have a very small selection, mostly for children. What's one to do? As more information is available, we find that several of the best actors and actresses of those Classics lived lives full of sin. I find it difficult to watch those films now. Same is true with current films. Isn't there danger in watching good films with actors and actresses I would not associate in daily life?

Miguel

From Chuck Colson:

These are good questions. Let’s start with what we know. As Christians, we are told that we must “hold to the good and flee every kind of evil” (1 Thessalonians 5:21-22). No one can dispute that violence, profanity, and sexual immorality have become mainstays of modern film. The Bible plainly instructs every follower of Christ to avoid exposing his or her mind to this kind of material.

But here’s where the difficulty lies. In our commercial society, corporations give away millions every year to political and social causes of which we may not approve.

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