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Worldview and You

teensA couple days ago my 19 year-old daughter, Lisa, asked a hard question I couldn’t answer. I’m taking her out for ice cream for it. That’s her prize for winning “Stump the Dad.”

Last month in this column I wrote about how “Homeschooling and Classical Christian Schooling Could Alter the Leadership of the Future.” While no one has said anything about this to me, I want to make sure that column didn't leave the wrong impression for those who don’t have those options available. Will your family be left behind? Not at all; at least, not necessarily.

I understand your position. My wife, Sara, and I didn’t have those options available for most of our children’s school years, either. (It’s only been in the past few years, anyway, that I’ve developed the strong beliefs I wrote about in last month’s column.) We homeschooled Jonathan and Lisa through a few grades, but most of their education was in public schools.
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All Things Examined

MV5BMTUwNjUzNjAzNV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwOTQ4Mjc1Nw._V1_SY317_CR20214317_AL_That’s the question that occurred to me after viewing the trailer for “Seventh-Gay Adventists,” a documentary about homosexuals in the church. The answer I gave on the BreakPoint Blog and a Facebook page promoting the film was as follows:

“The same way they should have been [receiving] heterosexual individuals and couples whose lifestyles are at odds with Scripture and church teaching: For non-members, enthusiastically welcome them and invite/include them in all programs, events, and services the church has to offer (Matt. 11:29); for those seeking membership, call them to repentance (Acts 2:38); for those who are already members, invoke church discipline for the purpose of restoring them into the fellowship (Matt. 18, Gal. 6:1); and for those who willfully remain in unbiblical lifestyles, disfellowship (1 Cor. 5)."

I also shared my suspicion, given the endorsement of gay advocacy groups and statements made by the filmmakers, that the purpose of the documentary is to convince Christians “to ‘get over’ their fetish with biblical teaching and ‘get on’ with the full integration of non-celibate homosexuals in all aspects of church life, including leadership, lay and ordained.”

In retrospect, I could have worded that more delicately. One of the filmmakers who read my comments took me to task for rushing to judgment on her work without seeing it. She offered to send me a complimentary DVD, which I accepted and recently viewed.

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Internally Displaced Person

Daniel_Deronda_2The non-religious word that comes to mind when reading about the events leading to the establishment of Israel in 1948 is “improbable.” (The religious word is of course “miraculous.”) More than 18 centuries after the Bar Kokhba Revolt, a Jewish state was not only reconstituted, but it spoke Hebrew, a language that had not been spoken as a vernacular since before the time of Jesus.

How it happened is a long and complicated story. (If you are interested, I would suggest three books to start with: “A History of the Jews” by Paul Johnson, “A Peace to End All Peace” by David Fromkin, and my favorite, “Righteous Victims” by Benny Morris.) There was the vision of Theodor Herzl, whose book “Der Judenstaat” (The Jewish State) created modern Zionism. There was the organizational genius of Chaim Weizmann, who turned Herzl’s vision into a political movement.

Vision and organizational genius wouldn’t have mattered without the tenacity, dedication, and discipline of the pre-1948 Jewish settlers, known collectively as the Yishuv (from the Hebrew word for “return”), led by David Ben-Gurion, who made the desert bloom and turned back the attempt by their neighbors to drive them into the sea after the 1947 partition of Palestine.

Then there were two books.
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Priorities

cirseal-white-color-343x350Over the last two decades, more than three-fourths of Iraq’s Christians have fled the country, driven out by a combination of Muslim fanaticism and economic and social collapse. Iraq, however, isn’t the only place to experience a mass Christian exodus in recent years.

Look at the Presbyterian Church (USA), the 10th largest denomination in this country. But you’d better look fast. The PC(USA), which is the nation’s largest Presbyterian denomination (at least for now), is driving out members through its own brand of leftist fanaticism.

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Semper Quaerens

Deliver_Us_from_Evil_2014_film_posterDeliver Us from Evil,” a supernatural thriller starring Eric Bana, Olivia Munn, and Édgar Ramírez, opens in theaters today. The film was inspired by the book of the same name, written by New York Police Detective Ralph Sarchie, about his actual experiences with demonic possession and exorcism.

In the film, Sarchie becomes convinced that something other than human evil is responsible for some of the horrific crimes he investigates—a view shared by his renegade priest friend, Joe Mendoza. Together, through the ancient rite of exorcism, they take on the demonic forces destroying the lives of their New York neighbors, which ultimately direct their rage against Sarchie's family.

“Deliver Us from Evil” is rated R for “bloody violence, grisly images, terror throughout, and language.” I interviewed Scott Derrickson, who both directed the film and co-wrote the screenplay, to learn more about the movie and why he decided to make it.
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Internally Displaced Person

amazon-fire-tv-advanced-tipsIn a recent BreakPoint broadcast, Eric Metaxas spoke about a “Christian colleague” who, despite having recorded every episode of the fourth season of “Game of Thrones,” hadn’t watched a single minute and suspected that he never would.

Well, I’m that “Christian colleague.” As Eric told listeners, the show’s nihilism was (and is) the primary reason I no longer care (if I ever did) about what happens in Westeros. But something John Piper wrote about the show’s graphic nudity has got me to thinking. (That BreakPoint’s resident Catholic is approvingly citing a well-known critic of Evangelicals & Catholics Together is a delightful irony for another day.)

Two years ago, I would have taken issue with some of what John Piper had to say about nudity and “Game of Thrones.” Now, while I’m not sure I would agree that watching the show amounts to “re-crucifying Christ,” I am much more inclined towards bright lines, and for many of the same reasons.
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Literary Lights

CowperJust yesterday, we bid farewell to a treasured friend from the UK who’d come for a weeklong visit: Lady Davson, a great-granddaughter (to the third degree) of the great anti-slavery reformer William Wilberforce. She is 76 years young, and a beloved “extra grandma” for our eight-year-old son Sam.

We spent hours enjoying the summer sun in our back garden—talking, gathering flowers, reading books, having meals, and picking wild strawberries. Time slowed, and brought us so many things to savor.

Being with Lady Davson, or Kate, as she prefers to be called, reminded me anew why so many friends in England cherish gardens. There, even the smallest patio, or backyard plot, is enchanted ground. Flowers cover all available space around a patch of lawn that may only be 10 feet square. But it matters not: Ten feet of lawn, with flowered palisades, makes up a kingdom all its own.

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Worldview and You

page65_picture0_1318351204I have a risky prediction to make today. Maybe it’s more of a hope than a prediction, maybe even an impossible, hopeless hope, but I don’t think so. I think there is substance to it.

Here is my prediction and my hope. Elite leadership in Western society today leans strongly toward the secular end of the polarization spectrum. I think that could reverse itself in the next generation.

I believe it’s possible, maybe even likely, that 15 to 25 years from now, America’s leadership will be heavily influenced, if not dominated, by men and women who were homeschooled or attended schools with curriculums based on a classical Christian education model including logic and rhetoric. The reason? Unlike far too many young people in too many other educational situations, these students are learning how to think and to communicate. Read More >
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All Things Examined

galaxyIn 1977 George Lucas struck box-office gold with the epic adventure “Star Wars.” Mystic luminaries, anthropomorphic androids, light sabers, and computerized special effects captured the imaginations of young and old alike. But perhaps the most lasting impression was left by Obi-wan Kenobi’s Delphic disclosure: “The Force is what gives a Jedi his power. . . . It surrounds us and penetrates us. It binds the galaxy together."

An invisible source of staggering energy, permeating the cosmos that common folk could summon for noble or ignoble ends, was the perfect hook for audiences brought up in the dawning age of high technology and Western mysticism. At the height of the film’s popularity I was playing on a community soccer team named “The Force”; we co-opted the film tagline, “May the Force be with you,” for our game whoop.

That tagline may have contained more truth than Lucas and Co. realized. Read More >
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Priorities

dogandbabyBack in the days of the Vietnam conflict, a hippie slogan gained a lot of cultural currency: “Make love, not war.” Today Pope Francis is advocating a new slogan: “Have babies, not pets.”

Okay, the Roman pontiff isn’t actually pushing for a memorable catchphrase, but he is urging married couples to remember that procreation is different than adopting a dog or a cat. In a homily on June 2, Francis decried what he termed a “culture of wellbeing.” Read More >

Literary Lights

audiobooks-headphones-colourfulThe American poet and man of letters James Russell Lowell left us with many a memorable line. Few did more than he, in the 19th century, to foster a love of literature, through his essays and work as an editor. His writings were learned and captivating. Dante, Chaucer, Spenser, Milton and Shakespeare—these were but some of the great writers Lowell commended through his books.

For four years, Lowell was editor of The Atlantic Monthly, and during that time, he introduced readers to the finest authors from his native New England. He was also Smith Professor of Modern Languages at Harvard, succeeding none other than Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

In 1845, Lowell published a book with a title I’ve always liked: “Conversations on Some of the Old Poets.”

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Worldview and You

too_stupid_to_understand_science_try_religion_flAre you a Christian? Then there’s something dreadfully wrong with you. You’re unthinking; you’re unscientific; you can’t see how badly Christianity botches morality. You represent a deeply defective culture that’s been getting all the most important things wrong for a hundred generations.

Did you know that?

You should; or at least, that’s the message many skeptics and atheists want to convey about you and me.

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All Things Examined

congregationWhether it is gaining members or retaining members, concern over church growth consumes the thoughts of church people, clergy and lay members alike.

Consider the metrics. With the possible exception of “tithes and offerings,” nothing is followed more meticulously than weekly attendance and membership. And nothing can create more angst than when a downturn develops.

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Priorities

Screen_Shot_2014-05-01_at_7.06.38_AMImagine more than 200 female, mostly Christian teenagers in an all-girls school getting kidnapped by an al-Qaeda-linked terror group whose name means “Western education is a sin.” Actually, you don’t have to imagine it. This nightmare scenario is Nigeria’s grim reality right now.

One night in mid-April, presumed members of the Boko Haram terrorist group invaded the school, which is situated in the Christian enclave of Chibok in northeastern Borno State. They took approximately 300 girls, aged 16 to 18, captive, and disappeared into the forest. While several dozen girls escaped from the open trucks of their kidnappers, the rest have not been heard from.

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Literary Lights

Moody_preachingCan sermons be a source of literature? For the skeptical, this may seem a contradiction wrapped in a question. But it’s worth taking a closer look, for many rewarding answers await.

Take up the prestigious Library of America volume titled “American Sermons: The Pilgrims to Martin Luther King Jr.” Here, one will see straightaway that many sermons have won a place in the American literary canon. Names we might expect to see—Winthrop, Mather, and Edwards—are there, and of course, Dr. King. But so too are other names, names we might not expect.

D. L. Moody’s name might, for many, be one of those that come as a surprise. To be sure, he was a preacher of international renown—but really, he only had a few years of formal education, voracious reader and autodidact though he was. Did he really have the kind of gifts that lent themselves to lines that endure, deservedly, in our living cultural memory?
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Internally Displaced Person

homer-plessy-16x9The October 2013 issue of National Geographic Magazine contained an article titled “The Changing Face of America.” The article was built around a series of arresting photographs featuring people who combined physical characteristics associated with different “races.” (Why I am using scare quotes is the point of what follows).

Between 2000, the first year it was possible to do so, and 2010, the number of Americans who checked off more than one “race” on their census form grew from 6.8 million to 9 million. And that probably understates the phenomenon. An estimated one third of all African-American men have European Y-DNA markers, which means that they have at least one ancestor of European descent. An untold number of “white” (yes, those are also scare quotes) Americans have some African or other “non-white” ancestry. Read More >
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Worldview and You

man_reading_bibleI can’t get used to the Bible.

I’ve been a follower of Jesus Christ for almost 40 years, in Christian ministry for nearly 35, and I still can’t get used to the Bible.

I memorized the first chapter of Ephesians in college, so it’s familiar enough; but just now when I opened up to that passage, I couldn’t get past the sixth verse. I could only put the book down, lean forward with my head in my hands, and lament: “Who can keep up with this?”

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Semper Quaerens

Heaven_posterWith more than 6 million copies of “Heaven is for Real sold, and translations being made in 36 languages, you knew there had to be a film in the works. “Heaven is for Real,” starring Greg Kinnear as Todd Burpo, Kelly Reilly as Sonja Burpo, and Conner Corum as four-year-old Colton, opens in theaters today (April 16). Will people like the movie as much as they did the book? I spoke with “Heaven is for Real” author Todd Burpo about the film, and how the explosive success of the book about a little boy's journey to Heaven has changed the lives of the entire Burpo family.

Anne: What did you think about how your family was portrayed on film?

Todd: It's really hard to watch yourself on screen, period. But as my friends watched it, they were just chuckling because of how good a job [the actors] did at portraying us. The second and third times I saw it, it was easier for me to watch it, and one of my friends said Greg Kinnear even walks like me—and he does. As far as portraying our family, especially the boy who plays Colton, it's impressive how good a job they did. It's almost too impressive. It's so impressive that . . . it gets creepy. How did they do that?

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All Things Examined

icon4Imagine travelling down the expressway, sunroof open, XM dialed in to the “’60’s on 6,” and lost in reverie until you catch a whiff of something—a bouquet with that certain rubbery tang. You glance down and notice the “Temp” indicator is red; you glance back up to catch the first puffs of steam wafting from the hood. You pull over, get out of the car, and raise the hood to an engine belching coolant in gray billows. As you wait for the tow truck, head in hands, the significance of those small puddles of antifreeze on the carport you’ve noticed, but ignored, for the last several days, becomes clear.

Something like that has happened in our nation. The national conscience, which for the better part of 200 years had been informed by Christian principles, developed a leak decades ago. It started as a slow drip, scarcely noticed. Left largely unattended, it progressed from a trickle to a stream to a gush that has led to the de-Christianization of America.
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Priorities

collegehumor.4bb6ac72a5485dd237ef8376cf5fb92aSometimes my most difficult Facebook arguments aren’t with nonbelievers—they’re with Christians.

A case in point: The other day I posted a link to an article with the title, “Startled Amazon tribesmen pictured jabbing their spears as they see an airplane for the first time.” It carried photos of some nearly naked men at a crude grass shelter in a jungle. They were part of a 200-member tribe in Brazil’s Acre state that so far has had no contact with the outside world.

The only observation I offered was this: “There are still peoples who haven't heard the good news. . . .” For Christians who believe in the Great Commission, it’s an obvious point—one hardly worth making. But I did it anyway, partly because I like to have a good mix of topics on my Facebook page, and partly because I have always been a missions advocate.

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