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Note: RE:News is a news aggregation website. A link on this page does not constitute an endorsement from BreakPoint. It simply means that we thought that the linked news item or opinion piece would be of interest to a Christian audience.

From The New York Times

"For the privileged, maybe the most grueling path seems the most likely to lead to divinity. When I run on Sunday mornings, I pass seven packed, bustling fitness boutiques, and five nearly empty churches."

Read more: Heather Havrilesky, New York Times Magazine, The New York Times
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From CNSNews.com

"The total withdrawal of U.S. forces from Iraq in December 2011 left the Christian communities in the lurch, and White urged members of the Life Center congregation in Tacoma to vote for politicians that would not have left Iraq. "The reason we had this tragedy now is because you came in and you left us too soon."

"'We weren't ready to be left,' he added."

Read more: Barbara Boland, CNSNews.com
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From The Washington Post

"While Catholicism in some ways has caused the chasm in DeMent’s family, it also compels the members to heal. Their faith, they say, demands that they treat one another with mercy, finding ways to love one another more deeply, despite their profound disagreement over DeMent’s sexual orientation."

Read more: Elizabeth Tenety, The Washington Post
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From First Things

"Now we’re in the midst of a gay rights campaign that is not reality-based. What, exactly, is achieved for gays and lesbians when Christian photographers are compelled to take pictures at their weddings? Or in securing the right to be married in the Hitching Post Wedding Chapel? Is the Great Cause of our time to be found in securing the right for confused men to use a women’s bathroom or vice versa?"

Read more: R. R. Reno, First Thoughts, First Things
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From Think Christian

"There are few, if any, arguments that can answer the questions raised by Brittany Maynard’s decision. But perhaps literature, in embodying the paradoxes of human existence in the same way that human beings embody the paradox of decaying life, can go where law, logic and theology fear to tread. Literature shines light upon the mysteries of our humanity, and in so doing, shows how much more mystery lurks."

Read more: Karen Swallow Prior, The Priory, Think Christian
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From Crux

"Yet unlike other tales of aging curmudgeons redeemed, from 'As Good as it Gets' to 'Gran Torino' to 'Get Low,' writer–director Theodore Melfi’s debut film doesn’t ask its protagonist to confront his demons. What young Oliver (newcomer Jaeden Lieberher) offers Vincent is not so much a moral impetus to change as an understanding heart."

Read more: Steven D. Greydanus, Crux
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From Reformedish

"All too often in these discussions of troubling texts, we collapse the cultural distance between us and the biblical characters. Human nature is, in many ways, constant. Conscience is one of those basic human features. Across cultures, everybody has a clear sense of right and wrong, norms against which we must not cross, and an internal compass about these sorts of things. That said, any student of culture knows there are some significant variations across cultures as well."

Read more: Derek Rishmawy, Reformedish
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From The Christian Science Monitor

"In Houston, a city prepping against any Ebola threat and making news for a battle between the mayor and the evangelical community over LGBT rights, is a former atheist English professor who now defends the Christian faith."

Read more: Lisa Suhay, The Christian Science Monitor
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From Mere Orthodoxy

"Many of us labor under the illusion that the progressive package, the party line, doesn’t exist. Some of those within the camp take its putative diversity and ideological inclusiveness as a point of pride. I suppose for them my aim is to pop their balloon. For others floating within progressivism’s orbit but not yet diving in head-first, I’m hoping to provide some smelling salts. Those looking in with interest would do well to consider the real intellectual and communal pressure there is to conform to the package and examine whether they find the underlying premises convincing and consistent with the gospel."

Read more: Derek Rishmawy, Mere Orthodoxy
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From Christ & Pop Culture

"The role of Christians in the lives of people struggling with sin is highlighted in a way that’s both deeply convicting and motivating. It was Christian after Christian after Christian that — through words and deeds — kept Jernigan closeted and in fear for so long. He felt that, more than anyone else, it was people in the Church who must not find out about his struggle. But it was also Christians who showed him the true Gospel and worked as powerful players in directing him toward healing."

Read more: Amber Stamper, Christ & Pop Culture
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From PARSE

"The day people around me stop questioning my character is the day my character begins to grow vulnerable. With visible 'success' in any profession (including church) comes power and reputation, which are always character dangers." 

Read more: John Ortberg, PARSE, Leadership Journal
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From First Things

"In my experience, evangelical schools are particularly deft at self-loathing. I say this as someone who has been in the academy for twenty years, as an undergraduate, graduate, and faculty member. In that time, I have learned or taught at an evangelical college, state university, and two Catholic universities (a Holy Cross institution and a Jesuit one). In two decades and four schools—ranging from conservative to liberal, private to public, pious to secular—I have never encountered the sheer volume of self-loathing that I experienced as a student (and professor) at an evangelical college. While my experience is anecdotal, I doubt if it’s unique. Why do so many students at evangelical colleges look with disdain upon their own institution—and, in a sense, upon themselves?"

Read more: Stephen Dilley, First Things
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