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'Do Fine Things'
Rating: 4.00


"In a May commencement address at the historically black Morehouse College, President Obama promoted same-sex marriage and cohabitation, advising the male audience of graduates to 'Be the best husband to your wife, or your boyfriend, or your partner.' As Southern Baptist pastor William Dwight McKissic, Sr., pointed out, this was 'an assault on Christian values and convictions held by the vast majority of Black Christians.' This dissonance between presidential ideology and the views of millions of black Americans extends far beyond one speech."

Read more: Luke Foster, On the Square, First Things

Comments:

@ Gina Dalfanzo

I'm sorry if you misread my previous comment that I was declaring that all Black Christians worship Obama and thus obey him instead of God's Word. I simply was pointing out how prevalent that sin is among Black Christians.

Sometimes, Obama-worshiping Black Christians are completely open about their sin as was the case with a member of my church. Others are like a female relative of mine, who finally admitted she supported Obama's re-election due to his race after I asked her which of his policies she supported.

Since Obama-based-and by extension race based-idolatry is such a problem in the church, Christians of any race should be free to discuss it. That would be the first step of freeing those who are trapped in that sin.

On that note, Christian radio talk show host Michael Brown wrote a great column on this topic called "An Open Letter to my Black Evangelical Friends"

http://townhall.com/columnists/michaelbrown/2012/11/13/an_open_letter_to_my_black_evangelical_friends
Fred, I understand your (and bholland's) point. I'm just saying, we need to avoid generalizations. What's true for some members of any given group isn't necessarily true for all.
@Gina Dalfonzo

I think bholland had a point. Speaking from conversations I've had, there are Black Christians whose vote for Obama was indeed idol worship.

In his commentary on idols in the Black church, Pastor Eric Redmond perfectly summed up the mindset of such Christians (disclaimer: I do know the pastor being quoted):

"My Christian position on the life of the unborn and the Biblical teaching on marriage have no place in my decision-making when it comes to the election of a President. He is African American, I am African American; nothing else matters."

http://ericredmond.wordpress.com/2009/06/29/the-gray-matter-of-african-american-syncretism-giving-honor-to-the-king-of-pop/

Redmond wrote the above back in 2009. What's scary is that it still applies four years later. I admit that my initial reaction was disgust when Black Christians again overwhelmingly supported Obama after his public endorsement of a sin (homosexual marriage) that they claimed to abhor.

The consequences of Black Christians voting against Biblical principles will last for decades. The mixed signals from Black Christians will cause confusion among young Christians on whether the Bible is correct in regard to homosexuality or sin in general. These signals also send the message that "real" Black Christians always put racial loyalty ahead of loyalty to Christ.

And let's not go into how unbelievers will view all this. Any unbeliever who dismissed the church as full of self-righteous hypocrites will feel vindicated by Black Christians' support for Obama.

So, I'm not at all shocked that Obama would push homosexuality at the Morehouse commencement. Why should Obama fear being rebuked when so many Black Christians practically worship him?
OK Gina, let me clarify a little. I think it's only fair to say that for many black Christians who voted overwhelmingly for a man who is diametrically opposed to biblical truth, simply because he is black, is idolatry based on race.
Bholland, thanks for commenting, but let's be careful with the generalizations -- it's not fair or accurate to characterize all Obama voters as idol worshipers.
Not really. The president got 95+% of black vote even after he came out in favor of SSM. So I wouldn't say that "This dissonance between presidential ideology and the views of millions of black Americans extends far beyond one speech." Blacks like my wife, who take the Bible seriously, and choose not to worship idols did not vote for Obama.