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Moralism is Not the Gospel (But Many Christians Think it Is)
by: Albert Mohler | albertmohler.com |April 8, 2014

Irreplaceable — The Traditional Family
By: John Stonestreet| BreakPoint This Week | April 11, 2014

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The Overprotected Kid
by: Hanna Rosin | theatlantic.com |March 19, 2014

The Irony of the Overprotected Child
by Jeffrey S. Dill | family-studies.org | April 8, 2014

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Sexual Atheism: Christian Dating Data Reveals a Deeper Spiritual Malaise
By Kenny Luck | christianpost.com | April 10, 2014

Irreplaceable — The Traditional Family
John Stonestreet|BreakPoint This Week |April 11, 2014

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Some Christian leaders and pastors make the resurrection of Jesus central to Christianity. Others say that it’s almost as if such people believe that Jesus dying for our sins wasn’t enough. And isn’t Christ’s death on the cross the central issue of Christianity, not his resurrection? Because it is Jesus’ death that redeems us, right?

There is a reason Jesus’ resurrection is so central to the Christian faith. It is not an optional article of faith—it is the faith! The resurrection of Jesus Christ and Christianity stand or fall together. One cannot be true without the other. Belief in the truth of Christianity is not merely faith in faith—ours or someone else’s—but rather faith in the risen Christ of history. Without the historical resurrection of Jesus, the Christian faith is a mere placebo. The apostle Paul said, “If Christ has not been raised, then your faith is useless” (1 Corinthians 15:17). Worship, fellowship, Bible study, the Christian life, and the church itself are worthless exercises in futility if Jesus has not been literally and physically raised from the dead. Without the resurrection, we might as well forget God, church, and following moral rules and “feast and drink, for tomorrow we die!” (1 Corinthians 15:32).

On the other hand, if Christ has been raised from the dead, then he is alive at this very moment, and we can know him personally. The whole of 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 gives us assurance that our sins are forgiven (see verse 3) and that Christ has broken the power of death (see verse 54). Furthermore, he promises that we too will be resurrected someday (see verse 22). We can trust him because he is sovereign over the world (see verse 27). And he will give us ultimate victory (see verse 57), as well as a plan for our lives (see verse 58).

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He Has Risen & Jesus the King
The Colson Center Store


 



 

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Too Good To Be False: Answering the "Legend" Critique of Lewis' Trilemma
Thinking Christian | December 14, 2013

 


 

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Study: 'Jesus' wife' fragment not a fake
By Daniel Burke | religion.blogs.cnn.com |April 10th, 2014

Gnostic Myths for $400, Alex
Eric Metaxas|BreakPoint Commentary |October 1, 2012

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The Final Journey
Carrie Seidman | heraldtribune.com

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On Being an Abortion Doula
Roc Morin | theatlantic.com | March 26 2014

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God promised the nation of Israel that he would raise up a descendant from King David who would one day establish a righteous throne forever (see 2 Samuel 7:11-16). The Hebrew word Messiah, the equivalent of the Greek Christ, actually means “Anointed One.” And it was this person who would usher in God’s eternal kingdom on earth.

More than 400 years before Jesus was born there existed over 60 major Old Testament prophecies about this coming Messiah, made over hundreds of years. This is of great historical and spiritual significance, because it is the Messiah who Isaiah prophesied would one day

remove the cloud of gloom, the shadow of death that hangs over the earth. He will swallow up death forever! The Sovereign Lord will wipe away all tears. He will remove forever all insults and mocking against his land and people. The Lord has spoken! (Isaiah 25:7-8).

The Evidence of Prophecy

Of course Jesus did claim to be the “Anointed One.” But do the prophesies of the Old Testament confirm that he was actually the Messiah? The answer is yes. It’s as if God gave us a specific way to recognize who the “Anointed One” would be, through what has been called Messianic prophesies.

It seems impossible, but because of these prophecies, out of billions of people born over thousands of years we are able to pinpoint one person in history as the Messiah. It is as if God had an answer waiting for us when we asked, “How will we know who the Messiah is?” Imagine we are having a conversation with God as he uses these prophecies to pinpoint who this Messiah would be.

God begins by saying, “You will know he is the Messiah because I will cause him to be born as an Israelite, a descendent of Abraham” (Genesis 22:18; Galatians 3:16).

“But God,” we protest, “Abraham’s descendants will be many!”

“Then I will narrow it down to only half of Abraham’s lineage and make him a descendant of Isaac, not Ishmael” (Genesis 21:12; Luke 3:23-34).

“That will help, but isn’t that still an awful lot of people?”

“Let him be born from Jacob’s line, then, eliminating half of Isaac’s lineage” (Numbers 24:17; Luke 3:23-34).

“But—”

“I will be more specific. Jacob will have 12 sons; I will bring forth the Messiah from the tribe of Judah” (Genesis 49:10; Luke 3:23-33).

“Won’t that still be a lot of people? Again, we may not recognize him when he comes.”

“Don’t worry! Look for him in the family line of Jesse” (Isaiah 11:1; Luke 3:23-32). “And from the house and lineage of Jesse’s youngest son, David” (  Jeremiah 23:5; Luke 3:23-31). “And then I will tell you where he will be born: Bethlehem, a tiny town in the area called Judah” (Micah 5:2; Matthew 2:1).

“But how will we know which person born there is the Messiah?”

“He will be preceded by a messenger who will prepare the way and announce his advent” (Isaiah 40:3; Matthew 3:1-2). “He will begin his ministry in Galilee” (Isaiah 9:1; Matthew 4:12-17) “and will teach in parables” (Psalm 78:2; Matthew 13:34-35), “performing many miracles” (Isaiah 35:5-6; Matthew 9:35).

“Okay, that should help a lot.”

“Oh,” God responds, “I’m just getting warmed up. He will ride into the city of Jerusalem on a donkey” (Zechariah 9:9; Matthew 21:2; Luke 19:35-37) “and will appear suddenly and forcefully at the temple courts and zealously ‘clean house’ ” (Psalm 69:9; Malachi 3:1; John 2:15-16). “Why, in one day I will fulfill no fewer than 29 specific prophecies spoken at least 500 years earlier about him! Listen to this:

  • He will be betrayed by a friend (Psalm 41:9; Matthew 26:49).
  • The price of his betrayal will be 30 pieces of silver (Zechariah 11:12; Matthew 26:15).
  • The betrayal money will be cast to the floor of my temple (Zechariah 11:13; Matthew 27:5).
  • His betrayal money will be used to buy the potter’s field (Zechariah 11:13; Matthew 27:7).
  • He will be forsaken and deserted by his disciples (Zechariah 13:7; Mark 14:50).
  • He will be accused by false witnesses (Psalm 35:11; Matthew 26:59-60).
  • He will be silent before his accusers (Isaiah 53:7; Matthew 27:12).
  • He will be wounded and bruised (Isaiah 53:5; Matthew 27:26).
  • He will be hated without a cause (Psalm 69:4; John 15:25).
  • He will be struck and spit on (Isaiah 50:6; Matthew 26:67).
  • He will be mocked, ridiculed, and rejected (Isaiah 53:3; Matthew 27:27-31).
  • He will collapse from weakness (Psalm 109:24-25; Luke 23:26).
  • He will be taunted with specific words (Psalm 22:6-8; Matthew 27:39-43).
  • People will shake their heads at him (Psalm 109:25; Matthew 27:39).
  • People will stare at him (Psalm 22:17; Luke 23:35).
  • He will be executed among ‘sinners’ (Isaiah 53:12; Matthew 27:38).
  • His hands and feet will be pierced (Psalm 22:16; Luke 23:33).
  • He will pray for his persecutors (Isaiah 53:12; Luke 23:34).
  • His friends and family will stand far off and watch (Psalm 38:11; Luke 23:49).
  • His garments will be divided up and awarded by the casting of lots (Psalm 22:18; John 19:23-24).
  • He will thirst (Psalm 69:21; John 19:28).
  • He will be given gall and vinegar (Psalm 69:21; Matthew 27:34).
  • He will commit himself to God (Psalm 31:5; Luke 23:46).
  • His bones will be left unbroken (Psalm 34:20; John 19:33).
  • His heart will rupture (Psalm 22:14; John 19:34).
  • His side will be pierced (Zechariah 12:10; John 19:34).
  • Darkness will come over the land at midday (Amos 8:9; Matthew 27:45).
  • He will be buried in a rich man’s tomb (Isaiah 53:9; Matthew 27:57-60).
  • He will enter Jerusalem as a king 483 years after the declaration of Artaxerxes to rebuild the temple (444 BC) (Daniel 9:24).  33

“As a final testimony, on the third day after his death, he will be raised from the dead” (Psalm 16:10; Acts 2:31), “ascend to heaven” (Psalm 68:18; Acts 1:9), “and be seated at my right hand in full majesty and authority” (Psalm 110:1; Hebrews 1:3).

As you can see, God has gone to extraordinary lengths to identify his Son Jesus as the Christ—the Messiah who would give his life for us. And one day, “when he has conquered all things, the Son will present himself to God, so that God, who gave his Son authority over all things, will be utterly supreme over everything everywhere” (1 Corinthians 15:28).

We can be confident that Jesus was the Messiah prophesied in Scripture. In fact, because there are 60 major Old Testament prophecies (with about 270 additional ramifications) fulfilled in one person named Jesus, we can be more than confident. The probability that all these prophecies were fulfilled in one person just by chance is overwhelmingly small.

This chapter originally appeared in 77 FAQs About God and the Bible by Sean McDowell and Josh McDowell (2012). Used by permission from Harvest House Publishers.

 

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6 Ridiculous Arguments Offered During Yesterday’s Hobby Lobby Hearing
By Sean Davis | thefederalist.com | March 26, 2014

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Jesus claimed to be the Son of God and the only way to God. And he wasn’t being arrogant about it. But did he actually give proof that he was God? How did he back up his claim to deity?

Jesus’ disciples were having a little difficulty understanding just who their Master was and what he was really up to. So he made this statement: “Just believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me. Or at least believe because of what you have seen me do” (  John 14:11). Here Jesus was appealing to both his authoritative teaching on the kingdom of God and his many miracles in order to substantiate and verify he was in fact God in human form. In regard to miracles, he was in effect saying, “You are finding it hard to believe that I am God in the flesh—well, look how I as creator of all things have complete command of the forces of the universe—the weather, the human body, gravity, life, and death.”

Listen to these words: “I have a greater witness than John,” Jesus said, “my teachings and my miracles. The Father gave me these works to accomplish, and they prove that he sent me” (  John 5:36). “The miracles I do in my Father’s name speak for me” (  John 10:25 niv). Jesus’ miracles became credible proof that he was who he claimed to be. So let’s look at a few miracles he performed.

But first, what actually is a miracle? It can be defined as a religiously significant intervention of God in the system of natural causes. Some people contend that miracles cannot occur because it is impossible to violate the laws of nature. But those who make this contention assume that nothing exists outside of nature. They believe we live in a closed system.

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The Hounding Of A Heretic
dish.andrewsullivan.com | April 3, 2014

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