The BreakPoint Blog

  • Does the Church Have a 'Plausibility' Problem?

    Since writing my book on "Same-Sex Marriage," I have been reading almost every book I can get my hands on related to homosexuality and the church. While there are some great books, there has been a huge need for a book that addresses the “plausibility” problem. I recently came across the book "Same-Sex Attraction and the Church" by Ed Shaw, and was pleasantly surprised that it dealt with this exact issue with clarity and insight. In my view, this book is one of the top five most important books for Christians to read on the subject. Pastor Ed was kind enough to answer a few of my questions. Enjoy!
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  • Martin Shkreli and the Failure of Utlitarianism

    The other night, I heard snippets of this congressional hearing on the radio. Martin Shkreli, who notoriously aised the price of a life-saving drug by 5000 percent, "appeared before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Thursday for a hearing on prescription drug prices." But he refused to testify or give the committee any help, only smiling when Rep. Elijah Cummings told him, "The way I see it, you can go down in history as the poster boy for greedy drug company executives, or you could change the system."

    It struck me that Shkreli is the perfect example of why utilitarianism doesn't work. If we all agree that we ought to base our actions on the principle of the greatest good for the greatest number, well and good. But suppose someone as powerful as Shkreli disagrees, and you can't make him agree by the use of either carrots or sticks? What if he doesn't care how he goes down in history, or whether he hurts or helps people, or whether he changes the system? What then? To what in his nature do you appeal, if not to a universal standard of right and wrong?
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  • 5 Tips for Young Apologists

    It seems strange to be writing a blog with advice for young apologists. After all, I still think of myself as young! There are many “seasoned” apologists I turn to for advice and direction that are much older and more experienced than me (don’t worry, dad, I won’t mention any names!). But since I’m turning 40 this May, I do have some insights for younger apologists that I have learned along the way.

    [For more, go to Sean's blog.]READ FULL ARTICLE »
  • Pray for the Johns Day 2016

    Once again this year, Pray for the Johns Day will encourage Christians to "ask God to intervene in the lives of those who participate in and support the sexual exploitation of others -- both so that they may be halted in this evil, and redirected toward what good works they could yet do." This year, the event will be held this Sunday, February 14. To learn more and to share information with your church, go here.

    And for those who haven't had a chance to see it before, here's my interview with event founder Anna Broadway about how and why the idea for Pray for the Johns Day came to her.READ FULL ARTICLE »
  • Thanks, NARAL!

    Never mind the Panthers -- it was NARAL Pro-Choice America who had the worst Super Bowl Sunday. The group made themselves a laughingstock on social media with their disparaging tweet about an ad featuring an unborn baby who was desperate for Doritos. (The ad is below the cut.) With this ad, complained NARAL, Doritos was "humanizing fetuses."

    Not content to be the butt of jokes and condemnation for its disregard of simple scientific truth, NARAL then doubled down by retweeting this from their Ohio affiliate about another ad: "Super Bowl Babies? Use protection, sports fans. #MediaWeLike"

    You'd almost think that the advocates of baby-killing don't like babies much. (Kind of like pro-choicers demonstrated last week, with their horror over rising birthrates after Texas defunded Planned Parenthood.) It was very helpful of them to make it so unmistakably clear. NARAL may have had a bad Super Bowl night, but thanks to them, pro-lifers had a great one.

    READ FULL ARTICLE »
  • Working Together

    At The Stream, Deacon Keith Fournier has an interesting take on Christian interaction in relation to this year's presidential campaign:

    "Everyone is analyzing what the Iowa caucuses mean for the GOP race. The evangelical turnout was huge, and many of the candidates -- some Protestant, some Catholic -- have reached out to Christian voters, and some of them have even spoken persuasively about their Christian faith and how it informs their political views. These are positive signs, to be sure. At the same time, I am struck by how there still seems to be no consensus on Protestants and Catholics working together." READ FULL ARTICLE »
  • Crisis in Masculinity

    Many have talked for years about the rapidly disappearing men in our culture. I’m not talking about guys. We’re flush with them. I mean real, grownup, well-adjusted males. Where are they?

    The Catholic Diocese of Phoenix is asking the same question. Last month it released a 12-minute film, “Society’s Crisis in Masculinity,” which “seeks to create awareness of a crisis in masculinity found in today’s society.” Now, the film is heavily geared toward Catholic men and I dearly wish it wouldn’t have narrowed its audience to this one demographic. This crisis impacts all of us. Even so, there are some powerful takeaways for all men.
    READ FULL ARTICLE »
  • One Man's Invasion . . .

    Raise your hand if you have ever heard of Eritrea. Raise both of them if you can find Eritrea on a map.

    Thought so.
    READ FULL ARTICLE »

The Point Radio

  • Not So Vestigial

    I always had a gut feeling the appendix mattered. For the Colson Center for Christian Worldview, I'm John Stonestreet with The Point.


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Worldview Bible



  • 1 Corinthians 12:12-14

    For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ. For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body—Jews or ...
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